Top 10 influencers in EdTech #Tech500

The Tyto Tech 500 Power List went live at the end of 2018, and for the first time, we can reveal the 10 most influential people in UK EdTech, as we dive into the data sector-by-sector.

In recent years the UK led the way in Europe for EdTech investing, with the next stage being how the government can support these investments through a robust and systematic approach around R&D and evidence gatheringto ensure technology delivers its promises in the education space. Analyst firm Gartner suggests that AI, immersive technology and smart spaces will be key focusesof 2019. According to UK Charity NESTA, a shortage of teachers in many countries may also play a significant role in driving EdTech adoption, and while not being able to directly replace face-to-face engagement with teachers, it can supplement it in many ways.

Which brings us back to this list of 10 people in the UK helping to drive and influence this space and the trends we are seeing in the shape and content of this list of influencers.

The top 10 is driven entirely by business leaders, with not only an alarming lack of gender parity, but also a surprising lack of public influence coming from government, the media or even academics. It may be that those areas are simply unable to compete with the level of investment in visibility undertaken by the members of this top 10.

Tyto Tech 500: Top 10 Influencers in EdTech

1 Andy Lancaster CIPD
2 Duncan Cheatle LearnAmp/The Supper Club
3 Eben Upton Raspberry Pi
4 Julian Hall Ultra Education
5 Donald Taylor The Learning Performance Institute
6 Jonathan Satchell LEO Learning
7 Nick Shackleton-Jones PA Consulting Group
8 Nigel Paine LNTV
9 Andrew Brode Learning Technologies Group plc
10 Laura Overton Towards Maturity
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Top 10 influencers in CleanTech #Tech500

The Tyto Tech 500 Power List went live at the end of 2018, and for the first time, we can reveal the 10 most influential people in UK CleanTech, as we dive into the data sector-by-sector.

2018 was a landmark year as climate change and environmentalism finally seemed to enter the public zeitgeist. However, when it comes to government level targets, no one could quite agree on what % of clean energy, although apparently “100% is the new black”, with California aiming for 100%(by 2050) and the EU criticised over its increase to a mere 32%(by 2030). Regardless of policy, the innovators aren’t slowing down, with advances in solar and battery technology, the latter having improved by over 80% in the last 8 years, being dubbed the “gas killer”.

Which brings us back to this list of 10 people in the UK helping to drive and influence this space and the trends we are seeing in the shape and content of this list of influencers.

Government is still playing a stronger role within this sector, in terms of influence, than many other tech sectors according to our findings, while academia is surprisingly light given the reliance, not only on infrastructure and policy but in continuing to innovate through both technology and consumer behaviour. Although it could be suggested that the two campaigners on the list will in some ways make up for this shortfall towards behaviour and policy, less so from a tech innovation perspective.

The 60/40 gender split on the list has some way to go but is one of the best we’ve seen throughout the sector breakdowns.

Tyto Tech 500: Top 10 Influencers in CleanTech

1 Tom Delay Carbon Trust
2 Doug Parr Greenpeace
3 Caroline Lucas Parliament
4 Molly Scott Cato Parliament
5 Peter Bance Origami Energy
6 Michael Liebreich BloombergNEF
7 Natalie Bennett Government
8 Damian Carrington The Guardian
9 Lang Banks WWF
10 Emily Gosden The Times

Top 10 influencers in Enterprise Tech #Tech500

The Tyto Tech 500 Power List went live at the end of 2018, and for the first time, we can reveal the 10 most influential people in UK Enterprise Tech, as we dive into the data sector by sector.

Enterprise AR is outpacing consumer AR, while according to Bain & Company, enterprises took up 60 percent of IoT early adopters in 2018, up from 40% in 2016. An overarching overarching trend for IoT in 2018 was that the number of smart devices has been growing steadily, with some of the biggest growth coming from medical IoT devices, which more the doubled year on year. AI adoption has been solid across enterprise, while cloud is now the “new normal”. Blockchain had been eyed cautiously by enterprise, but has begun to applied to solve problems from shippingto automotive, and this is clearly just the very beginning.

Which brings us back to this list of 10 people in the UK helping to drive and influence this space and what trends are we seeing in the shape and content of this list of influencers.

While certainly business driven, the list is not without its media influencers, in the form of journalist Chris Mellor of the Register and blogger and freelancer Madeline Bennett.

Tyto Tech 500: Top 10 Influencers in Enterprise Tech

1 Stephen Kelly Entrepreneur Investor
2 Niklas Zennstrom Atomico
3 Chris Mellor The Register
4 Julie Meyer Entrepreneur Country
5 Bruce Walker FutureX
6 Conrad Ford Funding Options Ltd.
7 Madeline Bennett Blogger/Freelance
8 James Mayes Mind the Product
9 Dave Chaffey Smart Insights
10 Russell Dalgleish Exolta Capital Partners

Top 10 influencers in Gaming #Tech500

The Tyto Tech 500 Power List went live at the end of 2018, and for the first time, we can reveal the 10 most influential people in UK Gaming, as we dive into the data sector-by-sector.

Whether you’re camp PC, console or fragging on the move with your mobile, the UK is the 5thlargest gaming market, with £5.11bn spent in 2018 and 37 million gamers. The UK games industry is worth nearly £3bn to the economy, employing over 47,000 people across the country. The finance and investment community has been paying close attention to the homegrown market recently, with several companies going public. Sheffield-based Sumo Digital (Sumo Group plc, Chinese Room is a subsidiary) led the charge in December of last year, before Codemasters and indie darling and Worms franchise creator Team17 floated in May 2018.

Which brings us back to this list of 10 people in the UK helping to drive and influence this space and the trends we are seeing in the shape and content of this list of influencers.

Dr Jo Twist, of UKie, who holds the second spot on the list was heavily involved in producing and promoting the report many of the stats above are taken from: “Screen Business: How tax incentives help power economic growth across the UK”. While top spot holder Jason Kingsley has been as individual and outspoken as ever in 2018; stating he has no interest in Rebellion going public, nor the ever-growing Games as a Service model.

Tyto Tech 500: Top 10 Influencers in Gaming

1 Jason Kingsley Rebellion
2 Dr Jo Twist OBE UKIE
3 Martin Wyatt Gfinity
4 Sean Murray Hello Games
5 Jeff Minter Llamasoft
6 Paul Chaloner Code Red Esports
7 Jupiter Hadley Indie Game Jams
8 Keith Stuart The Guardian
9 Ian Livingstone Sumo Group plc
10 Jessica Curry The Chinese Room

Top 10 influencers in Fintech #Tech500

The Tyto Tech 500 Power List went live at the end of 2018, and for the first time, we can reveal the 10 most influential people in UK Fintech, as we dive into the data sector-by-sector.

It’s been quite a year for Fintech, as Monzo joined Europe’s Fintech ‘unicorns’ and Blockchain continue to be applied across everything from bonds to securitisation. As for 2019, the year is poised to see a continued focus on regulation– and, unsurprisingly, an increase in RegTech– as Fintech continues to mature and become more embedded in the established financial system. Trends around operational resilience and ensuring competition and fairness within the industry look setto be key in 2019 as well.

Which brings us back to this list of 10 people in the UK helping to drive and influence this space and what trends are we seeing in the shape and content of this list of influencers.

Influence in this sector is divvied up between business leaders, two venture capitalists and Sky News journalist Faisal Islam. Challenger consultancy 11FS holds the two top spots of influence.

Tyto Tech 500: Top 10 Influencers in FinTech

1 Chris Skinner Male 11FS
4 Simon Taylor Male 11FS
8 Anne Boden Female Starling Bank
10 Jamie Burke Male Outlier Ventures
11 Lex Sokolin Male Autonomous Research
16 Megan Caywood Female Starling Bank
18 Faisal Islam Male Sky News
26 Goncalo de Vasconcelos Male SyndicateRoom
28 Eileen Burbidge Female Passion Capital
46 Jaidev Janardana Male Zopa

Top 10 influencers in HealthTech #Tech500

The Tyto Tech 500 Power List went live at the end of 2018, and for the first time, we can reveal the 10 most influential people in UK HealthTech, as we dive into the data sector-by-sector.

A combination of private and public investment and agenda setting, mass critical awareness, consumer willingness to adopt new tech, investor support and the Government’s public health agenda made 2018 a jumping off point for the next wave of health tech adoption and innovation. From a government perspective this has manifested as the NHS’ Five Year Forward View – offering a core focus on how digital tools can progress delivery of its services, while the NHS England run Clinical Entrepreneurs Programme is hand-picking entrepreneurs to design and deliver new tech solutions to help innovation within legacy practices.

Which brings us back to this list of 10 people in the UK helping to drive and influence this space and the trends we are seeing in the shape and content of this list of influencers.

Academic Bill Buchanan tops the list of influence, thanks in part to several cutting-edge studies looking at implementing blockchain within healthcare; the future of healthcare trust architecture and how connected consumer electronics and IoT can be used for simulations.

Tyto Tech 500: Top 10 Influencers in HealthTech

1 Bill Buchanan Napier University
2 Ali Parsa Babylon Health
3 Matteo Berlucchi your.MD
4 Juliet Bauer NHS England
5 Adam Pike SuperCarers
6 Mohammad Al-Ubaydli Patient Knows Best
7 Shafi Ahmed Medical Realities
8 Sarah Wilkinson NHS Digital
9 Jon Hoeksma Digital Health
10 Lee Dentith Now Healthcare Group

Top 10 influencers in AI #Tech500

The Tyto Tech 500 Power List went live at the end of 2018, and for the first time, we can reveal the 10 most influential people in UK AI sector, as we dive into the data sector-by-sector.

2018 was another big year for AI, whether it is consumer facing chat-bots feeling the norm, open banking apps offering a running dialogue on your spendinghabits or the latest batch of UK households joining the Alexa of Google home personal assistant club – possibly on the back of some festive gift giving; AI is starting to feel familiar, normal even, and that’s often a sign of a tipping point to the next stage.

We’ve seen machine learning continue to evolve, and AI is starting to offer real opportunitiesin the Quantum Computing space as well. There’s no question that the way many of us work and how the world’s supply chains function will continue into uncharted waters.

Which brings us back to this list of 10 people in the UK helping to drive and influence this space and the trends we are seeing in the shape and content of this list of influencers.

While we may be some way off equal gender representation, 30% feels like a step in the road to an equal and balanced list in future, especially as the sector continues to evolve. It appears we’re also seeing government take a backseat to those in business – and to a lesser extent journalism and academia – when it comes to connecting with audiences around AI.

Tyto Tech 500: Top 10 Influencers in Artificial Intelligence

1 Alex Hudson Metro UK
2 Anthony Walker Tech UK
3 Michael Natusch Prudential
4 Noel Sharkey Academic / NGO
5 Jackie Hunter BenevolentAI
6 Alan Mak Government MP
7 Demis Hassabis DeepMind
8 Sue Daley Tech UK
9 Mustafa Suleyman DeepMind
10 Joanna Bryson University of Bath
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Top 10 influencers in MadTech #Tech500

The Tyto Tech 500 Power List went live at the end of 2018, and for the first time, we can reveal the 10 most influential people in UK MadTech, as we dive into the data sector-by-sector.

MadTech is experiencing an interesting transition period as fast-moving tech changes are driving and changing the ways in which insights can be gathered, used and content delivered. From the numerous walled gardens, the ingoing content ecosystem wars and emerging areas such as voice this is an industry rife with opportunities and challenges to an extent seldom seen before.

The growing proliferation of smart home speakers, devices and virtual assistants could give rise to brand bias while the ever-changing climate of increasing scrutiny on data privacy and use, as well as data portability will require some smart policy and practical, creative approaches.

Which brings us back to this list of 10 people in the UK helping to drive and influence this space and the trends we are seeing in the shape and content of this list of influencers.

While we’re yet to reach a balanced gender ratio, this industry sector is one of the most positive we’ve found and demonstrates the possibilities for a balanced split of future influence, especially with Sarah Wood holding the top spot.

Interestingly, despite the evolving consumer behaviour that technology is driving and opportunities for the application of AI and Intelligent Machine Learning into the MadTech space, we’re yet to see any key academic influencers on this list – which is still fundamentally driven by those in business.

Tyto Tech 500: Top 10 Influencers in MadTech

1 Sarah Wood Unruly
2 Rory Sutherland Ogilvy Group UK
3 Paul Armstrong Here/Forth
4 Matt Navarra Consultant
5 Luke Lang Crowdcube
6 Rachel Barnes Freelance Journalist
7 Jeremy Waite IBM
8 Pippa Glucklich Dentsu Aegis Network
9 Emily Tan Gartner
10 Gideon Spanier Campaign
Retail

Heritage retailers fail to influence in the RetailTech 30

The Tyto Tech 500 Power List has been published for 2018, and for the first time, we can reveal the 30 most influential people in UK RetailTech.  

In a year where many high street retailers have faced serious financial troubles and with a number of high-profile companies going bust, you’d be forgiven to think that these businesses should be promoting innovation and embracing new technology. Retailers are being forced to respond to changing customer shopping habits to help save their business.  

However, no heritage retailers feature in the top 30 ranking of the most influential people in RetailTech. This doesn’t mean they’re not focused on innovation, but individuals at these brands are failing to impact the RetailTech discussion, nor influence the sector. This has a wider reputational impact for companies looking to pivot and shrug off outdated perceptions.  

Individuals from digital-first retailers such as ASOS, Farfetch and Thread do feature in the rankings, however they aren’t dominating, with these people in position 19 or lower. In comparison, Elizabeth Clark, founder and CEO of RetailTech businesses, Dream Agility, features 4th in the list, ahead of individuals at Drapers and the British Retail Consortium. This mirrors what we’ve seen in our full Tech 500 ranking, where only 13 representatives from FTSE100 companies featured, highlighting that resource isn’t a proxy for influence.  

The RetailTech ranking also illustrates gender imbalance in the sector, with women making up 40% of the top 30.  Although we’re yet to reach gender parity, we should celebrate the fact that all the top 12 influencers listed are female. The retail sector has historically been berated for the lack of opportunities for females in senior positions. Although this ranking doesn’t reflect seniority, it’s refreshing to see females leading the charge in the UK RetailTech sector.  

The RetailTech 30

1  Mary Portas – Retail Consultant 
2  Ashley Armstrong – The Daily Telegraph 
3  Fiona Briggs – Retail Times 
4  Elizabeth Clark – Dream Agility 
5  Natalie Berg – NBK Retail 
6  Maureen Hinton – GlobalData Retail 
7  Rebecca Thomson – Drapers 
8  Helen Dickinson – British Retail Consortium 
9  Caroline Baldwin – Essential Retail 
10  Cathy Parker – Institute of Place Management 
11  Diane Wehrle – Springboard Research 
12  Natalie Massenet – Imaginary Ventures 
13  Cally Russell – Mallzee 
14  Andrew Busby – Retail Reflections 
15  Graham Soult – CannyInsights.com 
16  Roger Wade – Boxpark 
17  George MacDonald – Retail Week 
18  Steve Dresser – Grocery Insight 
19  Nick Beighton – ASOS 
20  Bryan Roberts – TCC Global 
21  Chris Brook-Carter – Retail Week 
22  Ian Middleton – Argenteus Jewellery Ltd 
23  Kieran O’Neill – Thread 
24  Jose Neves – Farfetch.com 
25  Matthew Bradley – RBTE 
26  Ben Sillitoe – Sillitoe Media 
27  Nick Bubb – Retail Consultant 
28  Alan Hawkins – BIRA 
29  Ian Jindal – InternetRetailing 
30  Andrea Trocino – ASOS 

Download the Tyto Tech 500 Power List to read the full report

Influence no longer confined to newsrooms as business leaders top list of UK tech’s key opinion formers

According to the 2018 Tyto Tech 500 Power List, business leaders wield more influence than journalists in the UK technology sector. So much so that the second edition of the proprietary data-driven ranking sees the media knocked off the podium (within the general tech category) as the driving force behind the conversation in UK tech.

The list, which is compiled on the basis of a comprehensive assessment of social, online and offline influence across a range of metrics, features generalist business leaders more prominently (13%) than generalist journalists (10%). The shift represents a one-eighty when compared with last year’s rankings, in which generalist journalists were the largest sub-group, followed by fintech business leaders.

Interestingly, looking specifically at news outlets, apart from the BBC, no other single publication was able to make a significant impact on the list, or, for that matter, manage to exercise what could be defined as a heavy influence. There are 11 BBC journalists listed versus four from The Guardian and three each from TechCrunch, FT, and The Telegraph.

Thinking pragmatically, however, is this really all that surprising given the current political climate? In the last twelve months, the media has been under near constant attack from all sides. What’s more, today, just about anyone with an internet connection and a social media account has the capacity to publish and broadcast their views and news around the world.

Though primarily focused on, but not exclusive to, the media across the pond, journalists’ judgement, credibility and accuracy in reporting stories have not only been intensely scrutinised but repeatedly brought into question internationally.

The fact that fake news, defined as false, often sensational, information disseminated under the guise of news reporting, was recognised as Collins’ Word of the Year in 2017, due to the overwhelming increase in its usage and prominence, is an indication of the levels of global discontent with contemporary journalism.

Business leaders have, therefore, been able to steal a march on a denigrated media. With entire content machines at their disposal now the norm rather than the exception, combined with the creation and promotion of content through paid means having become a frequently adopted approach for audience targeting, it has never been cheaper and more time efficient to publish, advertise, and establish oneself online.

Though this shouldn’t necessarily be taken as gospel, on the basis of this ranking, it wouldn’t be unreasonable to class the influence and authority of ‘traditional’ journalism as being in decline. In any case, evidently, business leaders have been able to capitalise. Read more on how SMEs, in particular, are making the most of the opportunity, in Brendon’s blog here.

Download the Tyto Tech 500 Power List to read the full report.